Bonjour les chéries ! Vous possédez probablement une chemise en jean dans votre garde robe c’est obligatoire ! Mais savez-vous vraiment comment bien la porter ? On vous présente 8…

Bonjour les chéries ! Vous possédez probablement une chemise en jean dans votre garde robe c’est obligatoire ! Mais savez-vous vraiment comment bien la porter ? On vous présente 8…



Bonjour les chéries ! Vous possédez probablement une chemise en jean dans votre garde robe c'est obligatoire ! Mais savez-vous vraiment comment bien la porter ? On vous présente 8…

The dress's art means "training" in French and goes back to Xenophon in Greece and includes the military, as well as the famous riding schools developed during the Baroque period.

During the Renaissance, dressage was an appreciated art form, and the Spanish riding school in Vienna, which today is still known for its Lipizzaner stallions, has preserved that art. It is also described by some as a ballet on horseback. Horse and rider make it seem simple, but it requires a high level of athleticism, communication and skill to make these complex movements seem simple and graceful.

A dressage test that rides to music is called a cure. This can be a very enjoyable experience for the rider, as they get to choreograph their own test using the necessary parameters, and it is also very exciting for the spectator to witness too.

The modern Olympics began in 1896, with horse events first appearing in the 1900s game in Paris. Since horses were primarily used in the military up to that time, it was the test of the military horse that was standard during the perception of the modern Olympics. This test contained obedience and maneuverability, or what we now refer to as Dressage. At that time, the riders were all men, and most were also military. It wasn't until 1952 that women were allowed to compete in the knights track at the Olympics.

For top level competition, Arabic and Thoroughbred lines are most desirable, as they are bred to be refined with the attributes of a leggy, elegant horse with beautiful movement. These warmblood dominate the international dressage competitions that we know them today.

A standard size competition arena is about 100 feet X 200 feet, and the perimeter is marked with letters. Before entering the arena, you want to make sure your horse is impeccably prepared, the man is braided and the stick must be thoroughly cleaned.

There will be up to three judges who evaluate you and emphasize you on accuracy, attitude, obedience, agility and your skill as a rider. Once the rider has entered the ring, stops and greets the referee, you will perform the tasks described in your test, which consists of riding on different gaits, as well as various variations within the aisles in straight lines and circles, with the letters as your guide. Once you have completed your test, you will once again stop, greet the judge and leave the ring. In the dressage competition you compete against yourself to improve your own score.

All breeds of horse or pony can ride for dressage on the lower levels, as long as they are sweet, as the development of the horse's flexibility, balance and responsiveness to aids is intended to develop the horse's natural ability to make him calm, smooth and attentive to the rider. . The rider's strength, balance and position are the key. It is equally important for the rider to work on his own form and horses. This will make the signals clearer to your horse and result in the ultimate harmonic relationship between horse and rider.

When you train your horse for dressage it is important to exercise slowly to reduce sore muscles and a related horse. It is also important to allow time for relaxation and fun, so set some time for riding so your horse has the opportunity to stretch and use his other muscles as well.

When you practice with your horse in your own ring, you can easily make arena letters to place in suitable places to make it easier to memorize for a test. As you train your horse, you will focus on using your place, hands and legs effectively to cue your horse moving with intent and precision. No matter which discipline you prefer to ride, both you and your horse will benefit from basic dressage training.